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A Gift a Day 2017: Day 5: Polka Dot Skirt

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Polka Dot Skirt The Prudent Homemaker 

My five-year-old daughter has been wanting a polka dot skirt. She knew I had this fabric, and asked that I make her a skirt from it.

Because she is still small, I just cut one piece of fabric from selvage to selvage. I sewed the side seam together with a French seam.

Polka Dot Elastic Casing The Prudent Homemaker

I ironed 1/4 inch down across the top of the skirt, and then folded it and ironed it again at 1 1/4", to make a casing for the elastic. I sewed this part, leaving a small opening, and then ran the elastic through the casing by attaching a large safety pin to one end and pulling it through.

I hemmed the skirt in the same manner, first folding and ironing under 1/4", and then ironing an additional 2 inches, as I wanted a deep hem.

 

Supplies:

polka dot fabric (I used a little less than 2/3 of a yard)

1-inch wide elastic



Tools:


Sewing Machine

Iron

Sewing pins

Scissors

 

Time:

About an hour



Cost: $4

I purchased this fabric on a Black Friday sale several years ago from Fabric.com.

I purchased the elastic on sale in bulk from Wawak.

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A Gift a Day 2017: Day 4: Button Bobby Pins

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Button Bobby Pins The Prudent Homemaker

I made button bobby pins for my eldest a few years ago, as she puts her hair up every day. Her younger sisters often ask her to style their hair for them (you can see some of the styles she does from her Pinterest board). This year, one of my younger daughters asked for some of her own fancy bobby pins for her own hair for Christmas.

I was gifted a number of vintage buttons over the past year, and several of them were shank buttons, which were perfect to use for these.

 

Supplies:

bobby pins

shank buttons

jewelry wire



Tools:

wire cutters

needle nosed pliers

 

ShankButtons The Prudent Homemaker


Cut a piece of jewelry wire about 3 inches (approximately 7.5 cm) long for each bobby pin.

Wrap the wire through and around the end of the pin, through the shank button, and around the shank of the button several times, using the pliers to pull the wire tight each time.

When you get to the end of the wire, use the pliers to tuck the ends into the holes of the button, so that nothing sharp will stick out.



Time:

It took me 4 minutes per bobby pin (I've gotten a tad bit faster from when I made these three years ago). 

Cost:

$0.02 each.

I used buttons I had been gifted.

If you don't have buttons, you can purchase some on sale from Joann's, Hobby Lobby, etc. I usually buy buttons on sale for 40-50% off.

Black bobby pins can be bought from several different dollar stores.

I purchased the jewelry wire on a 40% off sale at Michael's several years ago. The wire regularly goes on sale, or you can use the coupon that comes in the weekly ad.

You can see the ones I made three years ago in this post.

 

Button Bobby Pins in Gift Box The Prudent Homemaker

Tagged in: A Gift A Day
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Flannel Scarf The Prudent Homemaker

This post contains affiliate links.

 

My eldest son needs a long, warm scarf. I have this beautiful herringbone brushed flannel that was just perfect for a scarf. It's super soft.

I didn't have a long enough piece from what I had, so I sewed together two pieces with a french seam in the middle before hemming all the edges.

I used an existing warm scarf of my own as a pattern for width and length.

 

Supplies:

approx. 1/2 yard (1/2 meter) flannel fabric

thread

Tools:

Sewing Machine

Iron

Sewing pins

Scissors

Time:

About 30 minutes. If you have a longer piece of fabric and don't need to piece it together, you can make this much faster.

 

Flannel Scarf 2 The Prudent Homemaker

Cost:

$3.24 (including tax)

I bought the flannel last year on sale at Joann's for $5.99 a yard. This took about half a yard.

 

Last year I made a vintage-style cloche with this fabric, which you can see here.

 

You can find the hat here and the gloves here.

Tagged in: A Gift A Day
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A Gift a Day 2017: Day 2: White Eyelet Skirt

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Eyelet Skirt The Prudent Homemaker

When I was at a garage sale in October, I found an unusual king-sized bed skirt for $1. It had snaps every few feet, but there was no middle piece that went on the bed itself for the eyelet ruffle to snap onto. Fortunately, the ruffle itself was what I needed. The seller was asking $1, and I gladly took all of that eyelet home. 

Not only did it have a ruffle, but it had a top edge just like the waistband of a skirt.

I cut out two pieces, avoiding the set-in snaps that were there. The skirt was rather long, so it was just perfect for a knee-length skirt for my 7-year-old, who asked me for a white skirt for Christmas.

The only tricky part was putting in the elastic. Since I had two pieces of skirt that would be closed once I sewed the sides together (as the existing skirt already had a "waistband" sewn in) I cut two pieces of elastic and sewed them in at each end. I sewed both sides of the skirt closed with French seams.

  

Supplies:

a piece of a bed skirt (or wide finished eyelet)

thread

elastic


Tools:

Sewing Machine

Iron

Sewing pins

Scissors

Eyelet Skirt Detail The Prudent Homemaker


Time:

About 30 minutes

Cost: 

$0.35, including the cost of elastic. I have lots of fabric left and I can make more projects with it. The same daughter who requested a white skirt has also requested a white dress, so I may work this same fabric into a dress for her as well.

Tagged in: A Gift A Day
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Harry Potter Pencil Bag The Prudent Homemaker

I've made lined pencil bags and other lined, zippered bags before. They're a pretty quick and simple gift to make. The important thing is to figure out what size you need it to be, depending on what purpose it will serve.

For this bag, I chose to cut the bag 9 x 4 inches and use a 1/2" seam allowance.

I used scraps to make this bag. As both the inside and the outside of the bag were made with thin fabric, I cut a lining from iron-on interfacing and ironed it to the wrong side of each fabric piece before sewing.

For the outside piece, I simply wrote the word "Quills" with a blue washable fabric marker before embroidering the entire thing by hand with an outline stitch in two strands of embroidery thread.

The outside is made from a line/cotton blend fabric. The inside is sewn with some leftover London map fabric I used for three other projects (a pillow, an apron, and a change purse). I made sure that Kings' Cross Station was visible when the bag was opened from the front.

 

Supplies:

2 pieces of fabric for outside (9 x 4 inches)

2 pieces of fabric for the lining (9 x 4 inches)

4 pieces of interfacing (8 x  inches)

zipper at least 9 inches long 

embroidery thread

Tutorial 


Tools:

Sewing Machine

Iron

Ruler

Sewing pins

Scissors

embroidery needle

Washable marking pen or pencil

embroidery hoop (optional)

 

Harry Potter Pencil Bag Lining The Prudent Homemaker

 

Time: 30 minutes for the bag itself (including cutting the fabric).  1 hour for the embroidery. 

Cost: $0.10, plus $1.44 for the pencils and eraser to go inside.

I used leftover scraps from other projects to make this, so the fabric didn't cost me anything. I used a few cents worth of embroidery thread. The zipper was one I inherited from my grandmother (she gave me a large number of zippers). The interfacing was purchased at a Black Friday sale. 

I spent $1 on the pencils I included and $0.33 on the polymer eraser. I bought the erasers with a coupon at back to school sales. The pencils were from the Target dollar spot (purchased in August).

 

For my Gift a Day series this year, I will be making gifts using only supplies I already have on hand. I'll include my cost when I purchased materials for the gift (i.e. when they weren't made from hand-me-down fabrics and/or supplies) but none of this money was spent recently. The pencils and eraser that are part of this gift are probably the only things that I purchased in 2017 for any of the gifts that I will be making. Everything else I already have on hand.

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Skirts The Prudent Homemaker

This was a sewing the inherited stash project. The plaid came from my mother-in-law's stash (a heavy fabric that was a home decorating scrap) and the pinwale corduroy came from grandmother's stash. Both women have passed away (my grandmother this year and my mother-in-law 3 years ago) and I am happy to be using the fabric that I chose from their vast amounts.

Both of these are warm skirts that should be great for everyday wear and play. I made them long enough to go just past the knee cap. 

For each skirt, I simply used the full width of the fabric (from selvage to selvage). I sewed the selvage ends together using a French seam (wrong side to wrong side, sewn together using 1/4" seam, then trimming the seam to 1/8", turning, ironing, and sewing right side to right side using a 3/8" seam).

I turned under the hem at 1/4" inch and ironed it. I then turned it under again (an inch and a quarter for the green skirt and a couple of inches for the plaid skirt; I cut the plaid one longer to allow for a deeper hem on the heavier fabric).  I pinned the hem and sewed it.

I did the same thing along the top, only I folded it over 1/4 inch and ironed, and then 1 1/4 inches and ironed it. I pinned this top seam. I sewed the top seam, leaving about 2 inches unsewn.

I pinned the end of my piece of elastic (cut slightly shorter than the child's waist measurement) through with a safety pin. I used the safety pin to thread the elastic through the casing I just made. Once I had it through, I overlapped the ends by an inch and sewed them together with a zig zag stitch. I then tucked the elastic into the skirt and finished sewing it closed along the seam line.

Headbands The Prudent Homemaker

 

Supplies for each:

2/3 yard of each fabric (more if you want a longer skirt, and twice as much if you want a fuller skirt)

2/3 yard elastic (depending on size of waist you may need a bit more or less)

headband fabric to match ( 2 1/2 inches wide by 16 inches long)

fabric for headband (a piece cut 2 1/2 inches wide by 16 inches long)



Tools:

Sewing Machine

Iron

Sewing pins

Scissors

Large safety pin



Time: Approximately 1 1/ hours per skirt, and 25 minutes per headband. 

Skirts and Headbands The Prudent Homemaker


Cost:  $0.34 each for the skirts (for the elastic) and $0.17 each per headband

My fabric was free, and the headbands were bought at a garage sale earlier this year. I removed the fabric covering to recover them to match. I purchased the elastic in bulk on sale from Wawak. The thread came from my grandmother.

 

Tagged in: A Gift A Day
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