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A Gift a Day: Day Four: Polka Dot Doll Dress

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Polka Dot Doll Dress The Prudent Homemaker

Supplies:

Polka dot fabric 15" by 44"

Small piece of white fabric for collar

Tiny bit of fusible interfacing for collar

Pattern from A Closetful of Doll Clothes

Bias tape or self-made bias from fabric to line the inside neckline of the dress

Velcro, snaps, or buttons to close dress


Tools:

Sewing Machine

Iron

Sewing pins

Scissors

Copier to copy patterns or tissue paper to trace patterns

 

I like the simple pattern pieces from this book that allow for endless combinations. The book is not a beginner book, however; there are patterns for several sizes of dolls but no instructions, as a basic knowledge of dress construction is expected. I chose the cap sleeves for this pattern since the doll it will go on has full plastic arms, but for a doll with partial plastic and partial cloth arms, a longer sleeve would look better. There are several sleeve length choices in the book.

All of the seam allowances are 1/4", save the edge of the collar, which is 1/8" (saving you the need to trim the collar before turning it).

Polka Dot Doll Dress Detail The Prudent Homemaker 

I lined the collar with lightweight fusible interfacing. I then turned and pressed it. I used a  little trick I learned years ago for sewing collars: butt the collar pieces together and sew them together first within the seam allowance before pinning them on the dress.

I chose to finish the neckline with bias tape. You could also just cut a piece on the bias, but I have some hand-me-down bias tape and chose to use it for the sake of time.

I cut a piece of velcro in half lengthwise to close the back of the dress. 

 

Time:

About 2 hours



Cost:

The polka dotted fabric was given to me. I bought the white fabric and interfacing at 50% off. I bought the book years ago and have made many doll clothes from it, so I am not including the price of the book with the price of the dress. I used bias tape that was given to me to line the neckline. I bought the velcro at 50% off.

Total cost: $0.25 

 

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A Gift a Day: Day Three: Polka Dotted Apron

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Polka Dot Apron The Prudent Homemaker

Aprons are used every day at my house. They protect clothing from stains and holes while cooking, doing dishes, gardening, and other projects around the house.

For this gift, I made Winter a new apron in her favorite color.

 

Supplies:

1 yard of fabric 58" wide

thread to match

existing apron to copy or free apron pattern (search Pinterest for a myriad of free apron patterns)



Tools:

Sewing machine

Scissors

Iron

Sewing pins

Long ruler or yardstick to measure apron ties

 

I copied an existing apron to make this apron. I used the existing apron as a pattern, folded in half lengthwise on top of the fabric (which was also folded in half) and cut around the apron, cutting about 1/2" away for a seam allowance. I cut the ties from the remaining fabric that was left lengthwise. (I did not fold my fabric down the middle for the apron. Instead, I folded it only as much as I needed, giving me more fabric on one side of the piece from which to cut ties.)



Time:

I prewash and dry all fabric before sewing, and I don't include that as part of my actual project time. Total time for this project was about 2 hours, and most of it was spent ironing hems.


Cost:

I bought this fabric on sale for 30% off at Hobby Lobby. I normally wait to buy fabric until it is 40% or preferably 50% off, but the store is new and I don't know if their sales go that low. Regular price this fabric is $10 a yard. (It is a slightly heavier weight fabric from the home decor section and is 100% cotton). I only needed a yard for this apron, but it you are making pockets, you will need a yard and a quarter. 

Total cost: $7

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A Gift a Day: Day Two: Sewing Kit in a Tin

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Sewing Kit in a Tin 1 The Prudent Homemaker

Supplies:

Tin

Scissors

Seam Ripper

Felt

Embroidery Thread

Sewing needles

 

Tools:

Scissors

Embroidery Thread

Embroidery needle

Pinking shears (optional)

Sewing machine (optional; you can sew this by hand)

Marking pen

Sewing Kit in a Tin 2 The Prudent Homemaker

This was a quick project, except for the embroidery. It is very difficult to see through felt, even with a light table. I did my best (after going over the main outine of  a miniature print image of the bird with sharpie) but ended up freehanding most of this bird with marking pen. I embroidered the bird with a back stitch.

I cut a piece of blue felt for the cover, making sure it was smaller than the box I chose when folded in half, and two slightly smaller pieces of cream felt for the inside. I used pinking shears to cut around the inside cream pieces, but this is purely optional.

I embroidered the bird without using a hoop. I outlined the bird in back stitch.

I sewed the three pieces together down the middle with the sewing machine.

I put some sewing needles in the felt pages.

I put the seam ripper, scissors, and needle book in the tin. 

 

Time:

Around an hour and a half, including the embroidery.

Sewing Kit in a Tin 3 The Prudent Homemaker

 

Cost:

I found the tin on clearance at Hobby Lobby for $1.02. It was full of pushpins, which I moved to our bulletin boards. I have seen empty tins like these at Michael's for $1 (often near the registers) and you can also buy plain tins (including ones that hinge) on Etsy.

The polka dotted embroidery scissors were $5.99 regular price at Hobby Lobby.  I used a 40% off coupon to bring the price down. They have several choices including the stork scissors that I like (my daughter pointed out the polka dotted ones to me when we went to check out Hobby Lobby after it opened here recently, so I chose those for her).

The small seam ripper I purchased from Wawak in an order I made several years ago. I knew eventually this daughter would want a sewing kit of her own so I bought a couple of seam rippers at the time. It was $0.59. You can get one at Walmart,  Joann's, Michael's, or Amazon.

I purchased the wool felt on Etsy for $2 a sheet. Prices have since changed as well as sizes for felt pieces (you can buy pieces as small as 6 by 8 inches now) so your price may vary. You don't need a whole sheet of either color, but if you have no supplies you will need to buy two sheets.

Total cost for this sewing kit was just under $7.

 

 

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Flour Sack Initial Kitchen Towels The Prudent Homemaker

Here is a gift you can give as a housewarming gift or as part of a bridal shower gift. It's simple and inexpensive. You can include a loaf of rosemary olive oil bread as well if you like.

 

Supplies:

 

Flour Sack Towels (You only need one for this project to cut into two towels)

Dritz Mark-B-Gone Marking Pen

White Thread

Embroidery Thread 

 

Tools:

Sewing Machine (optional)

Embroidery Needle

Scissors

Printer (optional)

Iron

Ruler

Embroidery hoop

 

Flour Sack Initial Kitchen Towels  A The Prudent Homemaker

 

I purchased the towels from Sam's Club in a pack of 12 for $12.78. They are 30" by 38". If you only want to make a few towels, Target carries this four pack for $3.99 (they are 30" by 30"), which you can buy in the store or online.

These are huge towels. I wash and dry them before doing the project to allow for any shrinkage to take place, as they are 100% cotton. 

I then fold them in half and iron them. I cut them in half along the fold line. I iron and hem the sides that I cut on my machine. The twoels already have a hem on two sides, so when I cut them, I cut them in that same direction, so that it will have a hem on both sides along the length.

I then fold the towels in half again lengthwise, and I use the Mark B Gone pen to mark the middle of the towels along the bottom edge (just a short line works fine).

To make the initial, I print a letter in a font I like. If you don't have a printer, you can draw on an initial. If you don't have a font that you like, you can try a site such as dafont.com to download some free fonts. (And if you don't have a word processing program, you can download Open Office for free.) For these towels, I used the font "Edwardian Script" printed at size 150.

I used a light table to trace my letter, measuring the bottom of the letter 3 1/2 inches up from the mark I made on the center bottom of the towel. However, you can simply tape your printed paper to a sunny window and trace the letter with the washable marking pen.

I then place the towels in a embroidery hoop and get to work! You can use any stitches you prefer. I used a stem stitch to do the entire letter. Where the letter was thicker, I made several rows of stem stitch next to one another. 

When you are done with the embroidery work, remove the towel from the hoop and rinse the blue marker off with clear water. It is important that you do not use soap, as soap will set the marker. 

Hang towels to dry, and iron again before gifting.

 

Time:

About one hour per embroidered letter. To cut towel and sew each half, about 15 minutes. Total time for 2 towels: 2 hours and 20 minutes.

 

Cost:

$1.20 for two towels 

Tagged in: A Gift A Day Gifts
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A Gift a Day: Day Ten: Rome Pillow

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Rome Pillow The Prudent Homemaker

Ezrom and I talked about making this pillow for his room a couple of months ago. He chose the image that he wanted. The little pillow will go on his bed.

He doesn't know I made it for him for Christmas.

 

Supplies:

Image from the Graphics Fairy

Iron-on transfer paper

Fabric for pillow and cover (I used unbleached muslin)

Batting

Thread

 

Tools:

Iron

Scissors

Sewing machine

Sewing pins

Paper cutter (optional)

 

My mom printed up the transfer sheet for me on her ink-jet printer (I have a laser printer and the sheets only work with ink-jet printers). I trimmed around the image with a paper cutter to make perfectly straight lines.

I used the trimmed image to meaure tow pieces of fabric. I put the image down on a double layer of fabric and added a sean allowance of 1/2" all the way around. I cut the fabric out.

I ironed the image on one piece of fabric. After it had cooled, I put the two pieces of fabric right-side together and sewed them closed on three side. Then I turned the whole thing right-side out. 

The instructions for the iron-on sheets say to wash the fabric after ironing on the image, so I washed it, but I did not put it through the dryer. I let it air-dry for a short while, and then ironed out the wrinkles. I also ironed the open edges along the edge of the image so that they would go inside the finished pillow.

I cut a couple pieces of batting the size of the finished pillow, making each long ebough to cover it four times. I folded the batting over until it was a thickness of 8 times, and I put that in the pillow.

I stitched the open end closed by hand.

 

Time:

 It took me around 30 minutes to make the pillow.

 

Cost:

$.84

I had everything on hand except for the transfer sheets. These were .84 each for the iron-on sheets. I used batting that I was given from my mother-in-law; you could also use batting from an old bed pillow. The muslin was part of the fabric that I received from my grandmother.

 

Did you make any gifts today? What did you make?

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Camp Half Blood Shirt The Prudent Homemaker

Ezrom is a huge Percy Jackson  fan. He asked for a "Camp Half-Blood" t-shirt. Some of you may remember that Winter and a friend of hers made one of these before for another friend's birthday gift. On that occasion, Winter wrote the words and drew the pegasus image by hand with Sharpies (it took 3). This time I lucked out; someone had already made an iron-on image that I could just print and use! That made this gift really quick and simple.

 

Supplies:

Orange t-shirt

Transfer

Iron-on transfer paper

 

Tools:

Iron

Ink-jet printer

Scissors

 

Time:

10 minutes

 

Cost:

$3

I paid $2 (plus tax)  for the t-shirt and the iron-on paper works out to .84 a sheet, plus the cost of ink. I don't own an ink-jet printer (I have a laser printer). My mom printed this for me on her printer.

Joann's has t-shirts on sale for $2 each this week, Wednesday through Saturday/ Regular price is $4.99, and they have children and adult sizes.

Michael's also carries them in adult sizes (regular price is $3.99 and they go on sale for $3, but I don't know if they are on sale this week).

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