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A Gift a Day 2014: Day Two: Camping Pillow

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Camping Pillow 1

 

Cyrus turned 11 earlier this year, which meant he moved from Cub Scouts to Boy Scouts. He loves Boy Scouts and is enjoying it so much.

Because Boy Scouts means camping, we have slowly been getting him some camping gear this year, including a backpack (specifially for camping), and a fantastic tent that my husband found at the thrift store for $4 earlier this year. He already has a sleeping bag. What he doesn't have is a roll-up camping pillow to take with him.

One of my readers sent me some fabulous Boy Scout fabric scraps that she had leftover from making something for her son. They were small pieces, but just the right size to make a camping pillow.

A camping pillow is small, and somewhat thin, so that it can provide comfort, but still be rolled in a backpack.

 

Supplies:

fabric

thread

polyfill quilt batting

Tools:

scissors

ruler

sewing machine

needle 

I researched sizes of camping pillows, and in the end decided on a 12 by 20 inch pillow. I cut two pieces of fabric, one blue and one green. I cut them 12 3/4" by 20 3/4" to allow for seam allowances.

I simply put them right sides together, and machine stitched them together on three sides.

Then I turned the pillow right-side out, and ironed it.

I cut a piece of batting that was the width of the pillow, and 5 times the height. I placed the batting on top of the pillow (to double check the size as I went) and folded it over 5 times.

It doesn't make a real thick pillow, but that is neccesary in order for it to be able to be rolled. 

I put the batting inside the pillow, and folded the open pillow edges inside along the seam allowance. I closed up the pillow with a whip stitch by hand.

Camping Pillow 2

Time:

The total time for one pilow was around 30 minutes.

Cost:

This project didn't cost me anything, as both the fabric and the batting were given to me (the batting came from my mother-in-law's stash that she shared with me).  

The pillows I saw for sale were made with plaid flannel. This project could be made with old flannel sheets, parts of old flannel shirts, the legs of a an old pair of flannel pajamas, or other repuposed fabric (such as old t-shirts). The filling could be the batting from an old bed pillow.

This size and type of pillow is also used as a travel pillow, and would make a good gift for a frequent traveler.

 A Gift a Day Series


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A Gift a Day 2014: Day One: Ribbon Headbands

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Ribbon Headbands 1

 

Winter will be 13 in December. At the current moment, one of her passions is trying out new hairstyles. Thanks to Pinterest, she has a wealth of ideas in front of her. 

I made these ribbon headbands for her using materials I had on hand.

 

Supplies:

ribbon

hair elastic

thread

lace (optional)

 

Tools:

scissors


sewing machine or needle and thread


measuring tape

 

You'll need to measure the length of the child's head as she will wear the headband, allowing for the elastic and some stretch. The ribbon will be a few inches (or decimeters) shorter than the length all the way around.

Thankfully for me, Winter had already made herself one of these, so I just borrowed it to measure the length. Her finished length of the ribbon was 19 3/4 inches. I added an inch for folding and cut my ribbons 20 3/4 inches long.

Place the ribbon over the elastic and fold it over twice, and then sew it closed close to the elastic. Repeat for the other side.

For the lace headband, I sewed the lace to the ribbon in two long rows with matching thread. I then finished it like the others.

 

Ribbon Headbands 2


Time:

The total time for one headband was less than 5 minutes.

Cost:

Your cost will vary by what supplies you have on hand. I bought elastics at the Dollar Tree (they have 100 for $1 with metal crimps or 35 for $1 without metal crimps). The gold ribbon came from a gift that we were given years ago. The cream-colored ribbon was one I have had since I was 14. The blue ribbon I bought on clearance at Joann's years ago; the amount I used for this piece was $0.80 (most ribbon is much less expensive; this was a more expensive one). I generaly buy ribbon when it is 50% off, and I buy the less expensive ribbon that sells by the spool.

The lace piece came from my mother-in-law. Before she died, she asked me to look through her fabric and choose whatever I would like. This piece is leftover from about 30 years ago, when she and one of my sisters-in-law used to make wedding gowns. This type of piece can be rather expensive. A good way to find pieces of lace for less is the thrift store and at garage sales.

In short, some of these cost me as little as $0.03 ( I had the more expensive elastics, or they would have been $0.01), and the blue one was $0.81).


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A Gift a Day 2014

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A Gift a Day TPH

 

Each weekday in November, I'll be making and posting a gift that I have made that day. These will be gifts for Christmas as well as for my eldest daughter's birthday, which is in December. I have 5 daugthers and 2 sons for whom I will be making gifts.

This year, I have fewer gifts to make than in previous years. I've found several wonderful gifts for my children at garage sales, including books, jewelry, games, clothing, and puzzles. I've used Swagbucks to redeem Amazon gift cards, and I've ordered a few things for the children that way as well.

I have been called to report for jury duty later this month, so how many gifts I finish will depend on whether or not I am chosen to serve on a jury. It may mean a delay of a few days' gifts or it may mean I won't be able to complete any more after that. I won't know until that time.

If you're planning a lot of present making this month, I would also like to remind you to clean and oil your sewing machine at this time, to keep it working well while you make gifts.

Check back tonight for today's gift!

 

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I made this scripture bag for Wren with some input from her. She wanted a different style bag from the one I had made for Winter. She also approved the fabric, so this gift won't be a total surprise, but she should like it, and that's important.

This bag is made very similar to the Eiffel Tower purse that I made, except that it also has an outside pocket for a small hymnbook.




Scripture Bag


Supplies:


heavy weight floral fabric (it's a Waverly home décor fabric)

drop cloth for lining

thread

Tools:


scissors
sewing machine
ruler

Time:

The total time was about 2 1/2 hours.


Cost:

$0.20

I purchased the Waverly print at the thrift store a year or two ago. I had been wanting to buy this particular fabric and was delighted to find large piece for so little.

 
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I made an Eiffel Tower purse for Elsa. She wanted a purse to take to church and she specifically wanted it to have an elastic closure with a button on the top. Since she loves anything to do with the Eiffel Tower right now, I thought she would be thrilled to have a purse with that on it.

Eiffel Tower Purse

Supplies:

drop cloth fabric (you could use cotton duck)

Eiffel Tower fabric (optional; you could line it with anything)

Eiffel Tower image

Citra Solv

shank button

hair elastic

thread

Tools:

scissors
sewing machine
ruler
kitchen spoon
paintbrush
laser printer
tape
iron and ironing board




The purse is a simple lined tote. I made my own size. You can follow this tutorial for instructions on how to make a lined tote. I added an inside pocket to mine so that she can put some lip balm there.

Time:

The total time for purse was about 2 hours.

Cost:

$ 2.75.

If you don't already have Citra Solv on hand, that will put you out a bit, but you only use a couple of tablespoons per transfer. I had been wanting to do some Citra Solv transfers for a while and I finally was able to use my Amazon credit to purchase some just for this reason.

I chose to use this particular image transfer method because I have a laser printer. There are a myriad of other transfer methods. Citra Solv transfers are a faded looking transfer. You print the image (in reverse if necessary), tape the paper print side down to your fabric so it doesn't move, brush some Citra Solv over the image, and then burnish it with the back of a spoon to transfer the ink to the fabric.

I purchased the Eiffel Tower fabric last year on sale with an additional 15% off coupon on Black Friday from Fabric.com. They have a lot of different Eiffel Tower fabrics if you do a search there.

The button was a vintage button from my button jar.

The hair elastic was from the Dollar Tree. I used one without a metal clamp; those are 30 for $1. They also have ones with metal clamps that are 100 for $1.

The drop cloth came from Lowe's.


 
Did you make any gifts today? What did you make?
 
 
Previous posts in this series this year:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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I completely scrapped my sewing plans for day twelve to make a houndstooth dress. I saw one online that morning and I remembered my mother-in-law gave me one of her dresses to make over several years ago. It's a heavy-weight mini-houndstooth fabric.

I have never completed a dress in a day before, but I was making a pretty uncomplicated dress, so I thought I would go for it. Plus, I planned on using the intact hem to cut my sewing time.

It turned out the hem  on my mother-in-law's dress was not sewn straight, so I ended up cutting the fabric to straighten it, using the houndstooth pattern as a guide, and hemming the dress.

I made sure to match the pattern on the front and back skirt and bodice pieces. It really makes the finished dress look better when your lines line up.

I worked on this dress during naptime, after naptime while the oldest were at the archery range, Ivory was taking a long nap, and Wren and Elsa watched a movie. Then I worked on it some more after they were in bed.

Technically, it's not completely done, because I discovered I didn't have any black buttons to go with it. I'll be ordering some on Black Friday from Wawak.



Houndstooth Dress

Supplies:

fabric

thread

buttons

dress pattern (I used one I already had that came free in a sewing magazine years ago).


Tools:

scissors
sewing machine

Time:

This dress took me about 6 hours.

Cost:

$0 so far, since I repurposed it from a hand-me-down. The buttons will be $0.43, so the total cost of the dress is $0.43.

I'm considering making a red belt to go with it from material from my grandmother and some D-rings that I cut off another item, so that wouldn't add any cost to the dress if I do that.

 
 
Did you make any gifts today? What did you make?
 
 
Previous posts in this series this year:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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